China confronted with evidence of its central role in facilitating, financing N. Korean proliferation — November 17, 2010

East-Asia-Intel.comNovember 17, 2010
President Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao discussed the problem of nuclear proliferation during a meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in South Korea as a United Nations report revealed Chinese support for North Korean nuclear proliferation activities.

President Barack Obama meets China’s President Hu Jintao at the G20 Summit in Seoul on Nov. 11. AFP/Philippe Wojazer
 

Obama said after meeting Hu on Nov. 11 that “as two leading nuclear powers, obviously, we have a special obligation to deal with issues of nuclear proliferation.” He did not elaborate.

The discussion followed the visit to Beijing in September by White House official Robert Einhorn who confronted the Chinese with evidence that Chinese state-run companies were continuing covert sales of missiles and nuclear technology and urged China’s government to halt the illicit trade.

Meanwhile, a U.N. panel of experts revealed in a report made public last week that China was involved in assisting shipments of chemical weapons goods from North Korea.

In 2009 South Korean authorities found a ship in Busan, Rachele, to be carrying working protective garments that were deemed to have military utility for chemical protection.

The shipment originated in Nampo, North Korea and transited through Dalian, China.

“The intended recipient of the goods was declared as the Environmental Study Center in the Syrian Arab Republic,” the report said, noting that the panel “concluded that these goods would primarily have military application in the protection against certain chemical agents.”

A second shipment in February was found to be spare parts for T-54/T-55 tanks for the Republic of Congo intercepted in South Africa. The shipment originated in North Korea and passed through Dalian “where it was loaded aboard the United Kingdom-flagged vessel Musca, and hidden by sacks of rice.”

“The shipper was subsequently identified as Machinery Exp. and Imp. Corp. in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” the report said. “After leaving Dalian, China, the cargo was offloaded in Port Klang, Malaysia, and transferred to the Westerhever, a ship flying the Liberia flag.”

“The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea relies on a limited number of shipping means and routes to handle its exports and imports,” the report said. “These include a small number of maritime ports, rail and road connections to China and the Russian Federation.”

“For covert missile shipments, North Korea has been using the Bank of China, in Beijing, and the China Construction Bank Corp., in Dandong, China, for financing.”

 

 

President Barack Obama meets China’s President Hu Jintao at the G20 Summit in Seoul on Nov. 11. AFP/Philippe Wojazer
 

Obama said after meeting Hu on Nov. 11 that “as two leading nuclear powers, obviously, we have a special obligation to deal with issues of nuclear proliferation.” He did not elaborate.

The discussion followed the visit to Beijing in September by White House official Robert Einhorn who confronted the Chinese with evidence that Chinese state-run companies were continuing covert sales of missiles and nuclear technology and urged China’s government to halt the illicit trade.

Meanwhile, a U.N. panel of experts revealed in a report made public last week that China was involved in assisting shipments of chemical weapons goods from North Korea.

In 2009 South Korean authorities found a ship in Busan, Rachele, to be carrying working protective garments that were deemed to have military utility for chemical protection.

The shipment originated in Nampo, North Korea and transited through Dalian, China.

“The intended recipient of the goods was declared as the Environmental Study Center in the Syrian Arab Republic,” the report said, noting that the panel “concluded that these goods would primarily have military application in the protection against certain chemical agents.”

A second shipment in February was found to be spare parts for T-54/T-55 tanks for the Republic of Congo intercepted in South Africa. The shipment originated in North Korea and passed through Dalian “where it was loaded aboard the United Kingdom-flagged vessel Musca, and hidden by sacks of rice.”

“The shipper was subsequently identified as Machinery Exp. and Imp. Corp. in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” the report said. “After leaving Dalian, China, the cargo was offloaded in Port Klang, Malaysia, and transferred to the Westerhever, a ship flying the Liberia flag.”

“The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea relies on a limited number of shipping means and routes to handle its exports and imports,” the report said. “These include a small number of maritime ports, rail and road connections to China and the Russian Federation.”

“For covert missile shipments, North Korea has been using the Bank of China, in Beijing, and the China Construction Bank Corp., in Dandong, China, for financing.”

 

 

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